The U.S. got more energy from renewables in 2019 than it did from coal, a year sooner than that same milestone is expected for the electricity sector on its own, according to the Energy Information Administration.

Last year the U.S. consumed 11.3 quadrillion British thermal units of coal, the lowest level since 1964. By comparison, total consumption of renewable energy hit a record-high 11.5 quads, the EIA said Thursday, as the country’s base of wind and solar farms continued to expand.

Prior to 2019, the last year that the country got more total energy from renewables than coal was 1885, when wood was

Southern Company has joined other major U.S. utilities in setting a net-zero carbon target for 2050, aiming to balance the emissions from its sizable fossil fuel-fired generation fleet and sprawling natural gas business with reductions to be gained by expanding its portfolio of renewable energy and energy efficiency. 

Wednesday's announcement puts Southern Company in the ranks of other U.S. utilities pledging mid-century net-zero carbon targets, including Xcel EnergyDuke EnergyDominion EnergyArizona Public Service, NRG, PSEG and Consumers Energy. Shareholder activist groups Ceres and As You Sow, which have pressed for the target, called it a significant improvement on the company’s

Massachusetts issued emergency revisions to its main solar support program last month to help an industry struggling with the coronavirus lockdown. But developers say the changes will have opposite their intended effect, causing the cancellation of hundreds of megawatts of distributed solar projects. 

Solar companies had sought an increase to the size of the popular Solar Massachusetts Renewable Target Program, or SMART, for almost as long as the program has existed. And when the state's Department of Energy Resources (DOER) expanded the program in April, the industry initially offered halting praise — Vote Solar recognized the changes as "incremental improvements" and the Solar Energy Industries Assocation said they would help "stabilize" the industry

Throughout his 15 years working in renewables, Benoit Allehaut has completed a number of ‘mission impossibles’: he's made a career in an emerging industry nicknamed 'the solarcoaster' for its ups and downs, he’s established himself as an expert on both development as well as financing, and he’s built up the second largest U.S. portfolio without relying on merchant risk.

In this #Solar100 interview, Allehaut discusses M&A in the post-virus environment, “detrimental investor behavior”, and advice for young people who want to work in renewables.

From foreign service to renewable energy

Richard Matsui: You have a surprising career background. It seems like almost everyone in

Massachusetts issued emergency revisions to its main solar support program last month to help an industry struggling with the coronavirus lockdown. But developers say the changes will have opposite their intended effect, causing the cancellation of hundreds of megawatts of distributed solar projects. 

Solar companies had sought an increase to the size of the popular Solar Massachusetts Renewable Target Program, or SMART, for almost as long as the program has existed. And when the state's Department of Energy Resources (DOER) expanded the program in April, the industry initially offered halting praise — Vote Solar recognized the changes as "incremental improvements" and the Solar Energy Industries Assocation said they would help "stabilize" the industry

In early April, Wood Mackenzie’s solar team reduced the outlook for U.S. commercial solar in 2020 by half due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The downgrade represents approximately 1 gigawatt of lost demand over the next two years. (For context, 14.4 gigawatts of commercial solar had been installed in the United States through the end of 2019.)

But how has this impacted the competitive landscape?

The biggest shift for commercial solar in recent years has been the move toward virtual power purchase agreements, or “corporate offtake” with utility-scale solar projects, according to a new WoodMac report on the U.S. commercial solar landscape.

Increasingly, businesses

Buckle up. Electric vehicle sales are expected to take a big hit this year amid the current health and economic crisis. Industry analysts say the long-term prospects for EVs remain strong, but the jury’s still out on how quickly the market will rebound.  

The EV market outlook could have a major impact on the U.S. economy overall. Boosting government investment in clean transportation is being championed by advocates and several lawmakers as a way to put Americans back to work and build out of the coronavirus downturn. The EV growth trajectory will also have a direct impact on whether or not the U.S. will be able to achieve the

Coronavirus will create a $400 billion hole in energy investment in 2020, but the power sector is faring relatively well compared to oil and gas, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA).

Going into 2020, the IEA had expected a 2 percent increase in global energy investments this year. It now expects a 20 percent drop. The devastating effect of a global economy in stasis means oil and gas investments will fall by a third this year, compared to a 10 percent decline in the power sector, the watchdog says.

A combination of lower energy prices, falling demand and unpaid residential bills will drag the global energy industry's total revenues down by

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