The open ocean is an unforgiving judge of engineering prowess. Salt water, gale-force winds, and relentless, punishing waves resist entrepreneurs’ determination to install power-generating devices in the water. The scale of that challenge is reflected in the marine energy industry's poor track record to date. 

Offshore wind turbines operate in harsh conditions, but they do so largely above the waterline. Marine energy devices, on the other hand, are exposed to the full force of the ocean’s ferocity by floating atop or below the waves. At the end of 2019, there were just 531 megawatts of wave, tidal and other marine energy technologies installed globally, according to the International Renewable Energy Agency.

Self-driving cars have the potential to revolutionze the flow of people and goods. Car crashes could become much rarer, and trips made more efficient. For those who drive to work, daily commutes could become far more productive and fun.

But for society, autonomous vehicles may come with significant downsides. As automotive players ranging from BMW to Uber look to develop self-driving cars and services, some studies have shown that they could make traffic jams worse.

In one example, researchers in 2018 tried to mimic the way car owners would use self-driving cars by giving subjects in the San Francisco Bay area a free chauffeur-driven vehicle

The U.K. government rejected Vattenfall's Thanet Extension offshore wind project on Tuesday, adding to a growing sense of frustration in Britain's world-leading offshore wind sector following permitting delays at several other key projects. 

Offshore wind is critical to the U.K.'s climate and energy targets, but three huge projects have seen permitting delays in recent months: Vattenfall’s Norfolk Vanguard and Norfolk Boreas projects, each 1,800 megawatts, and Ørsted’s 2,400-megawatt Hornsea 3. Hornsea 3 was supposed to be decided last October. The government has pointed to complications caused by the coronavirus for the delays with Boreas.

On Tuesday the government rejected Vattenfall's Thanet Extension project, citing its impact on shipping off the Kentish coast.

Europe's power system will look very different in 2030, with energy storage supporting the “dominance” of wind and solar generation, according to new research from Wood Mackenzie.

The big five European markets — Germany, U.K., France, Italy and Spain — will get the majority of their power from wind, solar and other variable renewable energy sources as early as 2023, WoodMac says. By 2040, Europe is expected to add another 169 gigawatts of wind and 172 gigawatts of solar. 

As that variable output surges, Europe has four options for balancing out its grid: pumped hydro, gas peakers, energy storage and interconnectors. Only the final three of the quartet are likely to be the focus

The U.K. government rejected Vattenfall's Thanet Extension offshore wind project on Tuesday, adding to a growing sense of frustration in Britain's world-leading offshore wind sector following permitting delays at several other key projects. 

Three huge U.K. offshore wind projects have seen permitting delays in recent months: Vattenfall’s Norfolk Vanguard and Norfolk Boreas projects, each 1,800 megawatts, and Ørsted’s 2,400-megawatt Hornsea 3. Hornsea 3 was supposed to be decided last October. The government has pointed to complications caused by the coronavirus for the latest delays.

On Tuesday the government rejected Vattenfall's Thanet Extension project, citing its impact on shipping off the Kentish coast. The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy rejected

Hawaiian Electric this week revealed the full list of winners from its second large-scale procurement of energy storage and renewables for the islands of Oahu, Maui and Hawaii. The winners run the gamut from major industry players like AES and Engie to relative newcomers to the large-scale energy storage game. 

The contracts were first announced on May 15 without naming the developers, to give each an opportunity to communicate with communities near their project sites to negotiate local land-use issues before a broad public announcement.

The winners include:

  • AES Distributed Energy, a subsidiary of U.S.-based energy company AES, which through its Fluence joint venture with Siemens has developed

In the past few months, three British offshore wind projects have been delayed, a total of 6 gigawatts. On Tuesday evening a fourth was blocked altogether. Although the industry maintains its faith in the support from the government, there is anger and concern that further hold-ups could have larger consequences.

Vattenfall’s Thanet Extension planned to add around 340 megawatts to the existing 300-megawatt Thanet project. The department for business, energy and industrial strategy (BEIS) said the impact on shipping was not outweighed by the additional renewable capacity the project would deliver. It was rejected after office hours on Tuesday.

Vattenfall’s Norfolk Vanguard and

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