Saudi Arabia is courting China for help with the next stage of its energy policy, amid predictions that renewable energy generation will change modern geopolitics.

Two Chinese solar giants unveiled Saudi manufacturing plans last month. The world’s fourth-largest PV maker, Longi, is planning a $2 billion Saudi Arabia-based solar panel backsheet production plant in association with the South Korean firm OCI.

A feasibility study for the project will be completed by mid-2019, Tariq Baksh, vice president of the chemicals and renewables program at Saudi Arabia’s National Industrial Clusters Program, told Reuters.

Meanwhile, the world’s largest thin-film PV manufacturer, Hong Kong-listed Hanergy, announced it would

Hawaiian Electric recently proposed seven solar-plus-storage projects to state regulators, totaling 262 megawatts of solar and a whopping 1,048 megawatt-hours of storage. The projects, contracted at record-low prices, will be distributed over the islands of Oahu, Hawaii and Maui.

If the Hawaii Public Utilities Commission approves these deals, Hawaiian Electric’s projects would nearly double current energy storage installations in the U.S. and grow Hawaii’s market exponentially. That makes this the second-largest storage announcement ever, just behind the recently approved Moss Landing project in California.

Shelee Kimura, Hawaiian Electric’s senior vice president of business development and strategy, will join us on stage in Scottsdale, Arizona this spring at

A recent report affirms that corporations have carved out a prominent position in growing the renewable energy market. According to research firm Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables, corporate contracts accounted for 22 percent of 2018 power purchase agreements of renewables in the U.S.     

WoodMac’s conclusions affirm a handful of findings that credit large corporations with pushing the solar and wind industries forward in 2018. The Business Renewables Center at the Rocky Mountain Institute, the American Wind Energy Association and Bloomberg New Energy Finance have also reported that last year was an annual record for companies purchasing solar and wind energy.

The annual DistribuTech conference is the place to discover the latest advances in power grid technology — and catch up on long-running technology efforts that are finally starting to bear near-commercial fruit. 

For the past six years, giant utility Duke Energy and a who’s-who list of corporate partners have been working on a technology known as an Open Field Message Bus, or OpenFMB. This standard is meant to allow smart meters, solar inverters, battery controllers, distribution grid control systems and communications network nodes to use their on-board computing power to solve edge-of-grid problems that happen too fast for centralized grid control systems to manage. 

Duke and its growing list

A recent report affirms that corporations have carved out a prominent position in growing the renewable energy market. According to research firm Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables, corporate contracts accounted for 22 percent of 2018 power-purchase agreements for renewables in the U.S.     

WoodMac’s conclusions affirm a handful of findings that credit large corporations with pushing the solar and wind industries forward in 2018. The Business Renewables Center at the Rocky Mountain Institute, the American Wind Energy Association, and Bloomberg New Energy Finance have also reported that last year was an annual record for companies purchasing solar and wind energy.

The dramatic

Desperation has taken hold in climate policy. People are so anxious to do something meaningful, allies are fighting against each other over the solutions. 

Is the right approach a Green New Deal to re-engineer the energy and labor markets with renewable energy? Or is it better to just price carbon in order to allow all kinds of technologies and carbon mitigation efforts to flourish?

We need both, says Hal Harvey, the CEO of Energy Innovation. In this episode, we’ll get beyond the tribalism and look at the suite of policies that will decarbonize the economy quickly and cost-effectively.

We’re going to talk

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Qatar Green Leaders is a Green Building Certification Management & Training Company, dedicated to helping its clients achieve the most feasible LEED / GSAS certification.

We are a privately-owned Qatari company established in June 2011 and operating from Doha, Qatar.

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