SolarEdge's core solar microelectronics business helped deliver record-breaking revenue in the first quarter of 2019, even as integration costs related to the company's string of recent acquisitions weighed on its earnings.

SolarEdge reported revenue of $271.9 million for the first quarter, up 3 percent from the fourth quarter of 2018 and up 30 percent from $209.9 million in the same quarter last year.

This kind of performance has become fairly standard for the Israel-based company, which has beat analyst earnings estimates in seven of the past eight quarters.

The news was not all positive for SolarEdge in Q1. Net income fell 47 percent from

Investment in building new European wind projects is stagnant, but total investment in the sector is at an all-time high thanks to a mergers and acquisitions frenzy for existing and development-stage assets.

Indeed, the number of investors queueing for a piece of wind energy action in Europe has become “unmanageable" in some cases, a leading financial adviser said.

“We can’t manage 60 non-disclosure agreements in a deal, kick out 30 investors and still have 30 interested investors in the process,” said Mortimer Menzel, partner at Augusta & Co, which has advised on renewable energy transactions totaling more than $11 billion.

“You can’t run an M&A

SolarEdge's core solar microelectronics business helped deliver record-breaking revenues in the first quarter of 2019, even as integration costs related to the company's string of recent acquisitions weighed on its earnings.

SolarEdge reported revenues of $271.9 million for the first quarter, up 3 percent from the fourth quarter of 2018 and up 30 percent from $209.9 million in the same quarter last year.

This kind of performance has become fairly standard for the Israel-based company, which has beat analyst earnings estimates in seven of the past eight quarters.

The news was not all positive for SolarEdge in Q1. Net income fell 47 percent

The firestorm disaster that wiped out an entire town last year has made it clear that the “Paradise” that once was California is in serious jeopardy. However, the horrific Camp Fire in Paradise presents an opportunity to reimagine the California Dream as a highly resilient and sustainable community system.

In fact, we can go beyond imagining. We have the technology now to rebuild with renewables-driven Community Microgrids that incorporate electric vehicles (EVs) and efficient, all-electric buildings.

Most state and local governments are currently operating under a reactive scenario, responding to crises of lost homes, communities, human lives, and livelihoods. Moving forward, we need

Senior executives at U.S. solar companies are 80 percent male and nearly 90 percent white, according to a new analysis of the industry from nonprofit advocate the Solar Foundation and the industry’s top trade group, the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA).

As the solar industry grows, those it employs remain unrepresentative of the U.S. at large, particularly at the upper levels, according to a 2019 solar industry diversity study prepared by the two groups.

For the industry overall, including installation jobs, the proportion of Hispanic and Latino workers is comparable to the overall workforce. But the representation of women and African-Americans

For well over a decade, researchers have been modeling the cost of state renewable energy mandates.

The results break down in predictable ways: conservative and progressive groups often come to very different conclusions based about costs and benefits.

An authoritative 2015 report from the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab found that compliance costs for state renewables targets only make up 2 percent of retail rates in most U.S. states.

After a lull, the debate over the cost of renewable energy targets is re-emerging. A new working paper from economists at the University of Chicago concludes that mandates are the most expensive way to reduce

Bankrupt utility Pacific Gas & Electric faces up to $1.4 billion in costs in 2019, and more than $14 billion in expected liabilities, associated with the deadly Northern California wildfires of 2017 and 2018 and its subsequent descent into bankruptcy protection.

It also faces a federal Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) investigation into its “public disclosures and accounting” for these wildfires. 

These were some of the key details from PG&E’s first quarter 2019 report. Quarterly earnings plunged 69 percent year on year, to $136 million. The drop was driven not by a change in revenue, which remained stable across both quarters, but by costs associated with

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Qatar Green Leaders is a Green Building Certification Management & Training Company, dedicated to helping its clients achieve the most feasible LEED / GSAS certification.

We are a privately-owned Qatari company established in June 2011 and operating from Doha, Qatar.

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