Will Congress' attempt at tax reform spell danger for clean energy?

House Republicans unveiled a massive tax reform bill last week. While it wasn’t as damaging to renewables as many feared, the changes still pose a threat.

Wind and electric vehicles stand to lose the most. Lawmakers are looking to slash tax credits for wind by more than a third and eliminate the $7,500 federal credit for electric vehicle purchases. The Senate is crafting its own version of the bill, however, so many of the proposals in the House version may never become law.

“This bill is going to get written in the Senate, because a lot of this stuff is not going to survive,”

Construction underway at the Vogtle nuclear plant in Georgia.

Monday kicked off four days of Georgia Public Service Commission hearings on the fate of the state's embattled Vogtle nuclear plant.

In August, developer Georgia Power recommended finishing the two-reactor expansion project, even as it racked up billions of dollars in budget overruns and a delayed timeline. On Monday, the Southern Company subsidiary, along with partners Oglethorpe Power, Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia, and the City of Dalton Utilities, again recommended that construction go forward.

“We believe nuclear is a dominant solution in our long-term energy future,” said Georgia Power chariman, president and CEO Paul Bowers, at the Monday hearing. “Completing both units represents the best economic

Renewables have grown powerful enough to alter the workings of power markets, which will in turn affect the future growth of wind and solar.

This unprecedented collision course creates uncertainty for the markets, but also opportunity, according to the combined insights of GTM Research, Wood Mackenzie and MAKE Consulting. The key will be thinking through the unintended consequences of the wind and solar acceleration, and adjusting behavior accordingly.

Renewables already compete on price with conventional generation

Wind already beats coal and combined cycle gas plants on levelized cost of energy. That number is expected to drop another 12.7 percent over the next five years,

Few Model 3 owners may see the benefit of a federal tax credit.

In a brutal earnings call last week, electric carmaker Tesla revealed that the company may have to push back a ramp up of production of its Model 3 electric car by three months, into March of next year.

Originally, Tesla wanted to grow its production of the Model 3 to 5,000 units per week by the end of 2017. But the company, run by billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk, has hit bottlenecks in manufacturing and won’t make that timeline. As of the end of the third quarter of 2017, Tesla had delivered just 222 Model 3 cars.

While Musk tried to downplay the adjustment

Emily Kirsch interviews Andrew Birch at the Powerhouse headquarters.

After a streak of strong growth years, the residential solar market hit a wall this year.

The final tally isn't in yet, but the list of casualties in 2017 speaks volumes: American Solar Direct, OneRoof EnergyNRG Home Solar, Direct Energy Solar's residential business, SolarCity (sunk into Tesla) and Sungevity.

That last one, Sungevity, capped a 10-year run with an acrimonious bankruptcy in March. At the time, the company's leadership refrained from commenting. Until now.

Founder and CEO Andrew Birch is finally speaking publicly for the first time.

Birch opened up

Few Model 3 owners may see the benefit of a federal tax credit.

In a brutal earnings call last week, electric carmaker Tesla revealed that the company may have to push back a ramp up of production of its Model 3 electric car by three months, into March of next year.

Originally, Tesla wanted to grow its production of the Model 3 to 5,000 units per week by the end of 2017. But the company, run by billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk, has hit bottlenecks in manufacturing and won’t make that timeline. As of the end of the third quarter of 2017, Tesla had delivered just 222 Model 3 cars.

While Musk tried to downplay the adjustment

A nuclear power plant at sunset.

On Tuesday, former FERC Chairmen Norman Bay reflected on the question he said "everyone in FERC world is trying to answer.” That is: what exactly does the Department of Energy’s notice of proposed rulemaking to support coal and nuclear mean for energy markets?

According to Bay, who resigned from his post just after President Trump's inauguration, the proposal would mean “significant” impacts for the industry. In laying down his concerns about the rulemaking, Bay joined a swelling number of prominent critics and skeptics of the NOPR.

“This is a very big deal for markets,” Bay said onstage in Austin at Greentech Media’s Power &

Tough competition in the upstream solar market means increased consolidation in the PV inverter and module-level power electronics (MLPE) industry in years to come. But the nascent energy storage and hybrid solar-battery sectors will take longer to shake out.

That’s one of the key takeaways from GTM Research's latest report, The Global PV Inverter and MLPE Landscape. It analyzes country-specific pricing and forecast details for microinverters, single-phase string inverters, three-phase string inverters, central inverters and DC optimizers across 25 vendors. (The number of vendors may shrink slightly, if consolidation in the space continues as expected.)

"Inverter prices show no sign of stabilizing, current technology trends

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