A chill has hit home solar. According to GTM Research’s latest U.S. Solar Market Insight report, Q3 2017 was the third consecutive quarter that the residential solar market fell by installation volume.

It's easy to blame the “big three” for this downturn -- collectively, SolarCity, Vivint Solar and Sunrun are down 32 percent in installation volume over the first three quarters of 2016, according to the latest U.S. PV Leaderboard. At the same time, we talk about the rest of the market -- the long tail -- as though it were an aggregate force tempering the downfalls of the behemoth big three.

In December 2016, Panasonic and Tesla finalized an agreement to begin manufacturing solar PV cells and modules at the "Gigafactory 2" in Buffalo, New York.

Under the arrangement, Panasonic agreed to cover the capital costs associated with the factory and Tesla agreed to purchase Panasonic's custom-manufactured solar products.

"These high-efficiency PV cells and modules will be used to produce solar panels in the non-solar roof products," according to Tesla's statement. "When production of the solar roof begins, Tesla will also incorporate Panasonic's cells into the many kinds of solar glass tile roofs that Tesla will be manufacturing."

Production of Tesla's Solar Roof product

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo kicked off 2018 with game-changing news for his state's storage industry.

Once New York Governor Andrew Cuomo endorsed energy storage as a component of his clean energy strategy, he went in big.

Cuomo kicked off 2018 with a series of clean energy proposals, including a groundbreaking energy storage pledge: to deploy 1,500 megawatts by 2025 as the state works toward 50 percent renewable energy by 2030. The target came just a month after he signed a bill to create a storage deployment program.

That's a bigger target than California's trend-setting 1,300 megawatt mandate, although it comes due five years later, when storage will be much cheaper and less bleeding-edge. New York's goal

In December 2016, Panasonic and Tesla finalized an agreement to begin manufacturing solar PV cells and modules at the "Gigafactory 2" in Buffalo, New York.

Under the arrangement, Panasonic agreed to cover the capital costs associated with the factory and Tesla agreed to purchase Panasonic's custom-manufactured solar products.

"These high-efficiency PV cells and modules will be used to produce solar panels in the non-solar roof products," according to Tesla's statement. "When production of the solar roof begins, Tesla will also incorporate Panasonic's cells into the many kinds of solar glass tile roofs that Tesla will be manufacturing."

Production of Tesla's Solar Roof product

Solar forecasting technologies are an increasingly valuable tool in optimizing the operation of the grid.

Just before Christmas, the U.S. Department of Energy announced a new round of funding for projects that advance solar forecasting technologies. Eight projects were awarded a total of $12 million. Add the cost-share requirements for awardees and the total value of the projects comes to $14.6 million of public and private sector investment.

“These projects will address a critical gap in our research, which is knowing precisely how much solar electricity to expect at any given hour on any given day,” Energy Secretary Rick Perry said in a statement.

The new tranche of funding builds upon projects funded by the Energy

When the numbers are finally tallied, Massachusetts will likely have a banner year for non-residential PV installations in 2017. According to the recently released Q4 2017 U.S. Solar Market Insight report, the Bay State is forecast to grow nearly 20 percent over a record-breaking 2016.

But the fanfare may be short-lived. Last year may prove to be the peak for non-residential solar installations in Massachusetts this decade. Pending regulatory outcomes related to the incentive successor program could make or break the second-largest non-residential market in the U.S., and define the tenor of solar deployments through the rest of the decade.

Massachusetts helps lead a

In December 2016, Panasonic and Tesla finalized an agreement to begin manufacturing solar PV cells and modules at the "Gigafactory 2" in Buffalo, New York.

Under the arrangement, Panasonic agreed to cover the capital costs associated with the factory and Tesla agreed to purchase Panasonic's custom manufactured solar products.

"These high-efficiency PV cells and modules will be used to produce solar panels in the non-solar roof products," according to Tesla's statement. "When production of the solar roof begins, Tesla will also incorporate Panasonic's cells into the many kinds of solar glass tile roofs that Tesla will be manufacturing."

Production of the solar roof

Last year was intense. It felt like news broke every minute of the day. We're starting 2018 the same way.

That intensity certainly held true in the world of data. Our GTM analysts were knee deep in record-breaking numbers, working closely with the editorial team to contextualize the biggest stories in the industry.

This week, we're pulling together the most important charts from 2017. In a nod to our former editor Eric Wesoff, we're calling it the charts that shook the earth

1. Here comes storage

Toward the end of last year, Tesla installed the largest lithium-ion battery ever in

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Qatar Green Leaders is a Green Building Certification Management & Training Company, dedicated to helping its clients achieve the most feasible LEED / GSAS certification.

We are a privately-owned Qatari company established in June 2011 and operating from Doha, Qatar.

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