KK Wind Solutions is pairing batteries with wind control systems.

The Section 201 trade case has injected a lot of uncertainty into America’s solar market. It’s hard to plan with the threat of new tariffs. It’s even harder to plan in this political environment. 

But the solar industry is used to uncertainty. That’s why so many people call it the “solar coaster.” Beyond trade wars, the industry has routinely dealt with uncertainty around tax credits, the stimulus program, state mandates and incentives, and now, the prospect of a tax reform bill in Congress.

Put simply, solar market volatility is the norm, not the exception in the U.S.

But as the market matures and expands

What will happen to renewables when the Senate and House bills come together?

After the the House’s version of a tax overhaul bill slashed clean energy credits, the industry expressed widespread anxiety. But the Senate’s draft mostly spares incentives for clean energy projects. 

The House bill proposed slashing the Production Tax Credit (PTC) for wind by over a third. It also eliminates a $7,500 credit for electric-vehicle purchases. The solar industry would see an end to the Investment Tax Credit after 2027 for commercial and utility-scale solar projects, and an end to the 10 percent credit for residential projects (which is already set to expire in 2021). Under current law, commercial projects would still benefit from a 10

A manufacturers' substrate choice has a big impact on the green credentials of LED bulbs.

The rise of LED light bulbs has been driven in large part by their environmental credentials, and rightly so. LEDs consume a fraction of the power used by traditional incandescent bulbs and have exceptional longevity, lasting up to 25,000 hours.

Most of an LED’s environmental impact (around 98 percent) is incurred during its use. Factors such as longevity and efficiency present the greatest opportunity for LED manufacturers to improve the environmental impact of their products. After that, the biggest influencing factor -- the "greenness" of the power source itself -- is out of the manufacturers’ hands.

However, while only constituting around 2 percent of the overall environmental

Lazard's latest cost analysis of renewables and storage is a mixed bag.

An Australian team is looking to commercialize a large-scale sodium battery technology, despite the chemistry’s long and checkered history. 

Researchers at the University of Wollongong (UOW), New South Wales, are developing a 5-kilowatt-hour sodium-ion battery pack that can be used for stationary storage applications, according to the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA).

A 30-kilowatt-hour battery system is due to be tested alongside solar panels at a Sydney Water sewage pumping station in 2019, said ARENA, which has put AUD $2.7 million (USD $2.1 million) into developing the technology. 

Before then, a single 5-kilowatt-hour battery will debut in a UOW sustainable home showcase called the Illawarra Flame

KK Wind Solutions is pairing batteries with wind control systems.

KK Wind Solutions, a Danish wind systems developer, is planning to use turbine-based batteries to reduce output fluctuations by 90 percent. The company said it could achieve the reduction with storage levels amounting to about 8 percent of total wind farm capacity.

“The purpose of the project is to develop a new modular battery storage solution, which is integrated into the wind turbine itself,” said the company in a press release last month. “The solution will be based on a combination of state-of-the-art battery technology and software algorithms that enable monitoring and control of the batteries.”

Turbine maker Vestas, Danish engineering firm PowerCon and Denmark’s

Lazard's latest cost analysis of renewables and storage is a mixed bag.

An Australian team is looking to commercialize a large-scale sodium battery technology, despite the chemistry’s long and checkered history. 

Researchers at the University of Wollongong (UOW), New South Wales, are developing a 5-kilowatt-hour sodium-ion battery pack that can be used for stationary storage applications, according to the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA).

A 30-kilowatt-hour battery system is due to be tested alongside solar panels at a Sydney Water sewage pumping station in 2019, said ARENA, which has put AUD $2.7 million (USD $2.1 million) into developing the technology. 

Before then, a single 5-kilowatt-hour battery will debut in a UOW sustainable home showcase called the Illawarra Flame

President Trump meets with President Xi Jinping on a trip to China.

Significant policy changes are looming for the U.S. clean energy sector -- between federal tax reform, new state-level leadership, global trade debates, and more. At the same time, a lack of action from the highest levels of government could have just as much influence how well (or not) the U.S. cleantech industry fares in the coming years.

On our latest episode of The Green Room -- GTM's live video series on clean energy news and issues, from a bipartisan perspective -- we discuss tax reform, local election results, President Trump's trip to China, pending solar import tariffs and the Department of Energy's proposed rulemaking to support

Lazard's latest cost analysis of renewables and storage is a mixed bag.

An Australian team is looking to commercialize a large-scale sodium battery technology, despite the chemistry’s long and checkered history. 

Researchers at the University of Wollongong (UOW), New South Wales, are developing a 5-kilowatt-hour sodium-ion battery pack that can be used for stationary storage applications, according to the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA).

A 30-kilowatt-hour battery system is due to be tested alongside solar panels at a Sydney Water sewage pumping station in 2019, said ARENA, which has put AUD $2.7 million (USD $2.1 million) into developing the technology. 

Before then, a single 5-kilowatt-hour battery will debut in a UOW sustainable home showcase called the Illawarra Flame

About us...

Qatar Green Leaders is a Green Building Certification Management & Training Company, dedicated to helping its clients achieve the most feasible LEED / GSAS certification.

We are a privately-owned Qatari company established in June 2011 and operating from Doha, Qatar.

Follow QGL...

Newsletter

If you wish to receive our regular news & updates, please subscribe now to our newsletter:
captcha 
© 2017 Qatar Green Leaders. All Rights Reserved.

Search