The ‘Spectre’ and ‘Meltdown’ Chip Vulnerabilities Could Affect Grid Hardware

Grid infrastructure could be at risk from a microprocessor vulnerability that has shaken up the IT industry, warn analysts.

Dima Tokar, co-founder and chief technology officer at the internet-of-things analysis firm MachNation, said a security loophole unveiled this month could be present in many energy plant components. 

“This vulnerability is wide-reaching and affects many different [chip] makers,” he said. “Anyone operating mission-critical systems or infrastructure should assume they are vulnerable until they confirm otherwise.” 

Ben Kellison, director of grid research at GTM Research, said it was still unclear how profoundly the problem might impact the energy industry. “If this issue is only a problem in shared

California regulators rejected an effort to award lucrative "must-run" status to three Calpine gas plants, calling for new energy storage and clean resources instead.

The California Public Utilities Commission ruled Thursday to authorize PG&E to procure energy storage or preferred resources (such as demand response or distributed solar) to ensure local reliability in areas previously served by the gas plants. The new resources can be individual or aggregated, and must be available by 2019 "if feasible and at a reasonable cost to ratepayers."

This appears to be the first time a utility will procure energy storage to replace existing gas plants

Mexico has emerged as a top market for solar in Latin America. In the wake of the country's energy market reform, solar projects are more competitive than ever. Developers are scrambling to get in on the action.

In advance of Solar Summit Mexico next month, we're giving you a sneak peek at GTM Research's latest Latin America PV Playbook, the industry's most in-depth analysis of the budding South American, Central American and Caribbean solar markets. 

  • By 2022, Latin America will account for 11 percent of the global PV demand (up from 3 percent in 2017)
  • GTM Research forecasts the

Nissan Motors did not unveil a new electric vehicle at the 2018 Consumer Electronics Show. 

The Japanese automaker had a sizable expo display, but opted not hold a high-production press event. Instead, Carlos Ghosn, chairman and CEO of France-based Renault, chairman and former CEO of Japan-based Nissan, and chairman of Mitsubishi Motors, held a media Q&A in a conference room.

There were no spotlights and no music -- not even a PowerPoint presentation. 

The event seemed to reflect the automaker’s current market strategy, which Ghosn said is centered on deploying next generation vehicle technology, rather than peddling concepts -- which is common at CES. For

While lithium-ion batteries are undergoing an historic scale-up, researchers are also hard at work looking for what battery technology might come next.

A big battery breakthrough could lead to electric cars that could drive longer on a single charge and are safer to operate. Better batteries for the grid could store more energy, enabling the deployment of more wind and solar.

“There’s a worldwide race for these kinds of concepts,” said Paul Albertus, program director for ARPA-E, the Department of Energy program that focuses on early-stage, potentially big-impact energy research.

Last month, Albertus and his ARPA-E colleague Sue Babinec published an article in Nature Energy

Tax equity investors are still analyzing the clean energy impacts of the tax bill.

Tax equity investors have mostly kept quiet on how the Republican tax bill, which President Trump signed into law in December, may impact their participation in the clean energy market. 

During a Thursday webinar from law firm Norton Rose Fulbright, investors emphasized that the market remains in limbo. However, big financial entities are getting clarity about the future of tax equity, which makes up 40 to 50 percent of financing for solar projects and 50 to 60 percent for wind projects. 

“We’re in a moment of reset and investors are evaluating their positions,” said Jack Cargas, managing director of renewable energy finance at Bank of America Merrill

California regulators rejected an effort to award lucrative "must-run" status to three Calpine gas plants, calling for new energy storage and clean resources instead.

The California Public Utilities Commission ruled Thursday to authorize PG&E to procure energy storage or preferred resources (such as demand response or distributed solar) to ensure local reliability in areas previously served by the gas plants. The new resources can be individual or aggregated, and must be available by 2019 "if feasible and at a reasonable cost to ratepayers."

This appears to be the first time a utility will procure energy storage to replace existing gas plants

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We are a privately-owned Qatari company established in June 2011 and operating from Doha, Qatar.

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